Can you associate a USER with a record in a TABLE?

  • 0
  • 1
  • Question
  • Updated 6 years ago
  • Answered

We have a project management table (including a tasks table) and a CRM table for customer data and a Contacts table all blended into one app. Each table has its own tab in the app.


We now want to add a help desk table.


We are trying to build it as a custom app since it is fairly straightforward.


Here’s the problem we’re trying to solve:


Inside the Help Desk app we’d like to association each request not only with the user who is submitting it, but also to a customer. The user is a staff member of the customer in other words.


Right now we can associate a request to a USER (which is not a contact in the APP associated with the customer, it's just a QB USER), but we can’t seem to figure out how to associate a QB user with a customer record. What this would solve is that we would know what customer to attribute the request to. Having just a user attribute doesn’t connect the request back into the main customer table in any way.


We’ve considered relating the request table to the customer table, but best we can seem to achieve there is that the customer would have to pick their own name from a drop down of all our customers, which is not an ideal situation.


So, the question basically is: Can you associate a QB user with a particular record in a table so that you can associate that users activity with something like a customer? If not, any ideas on a way to keep the help desk requests associated with a customer record?

Photo of Chris Bonney

Chris Bonney

  • 2 Points

Posted 6 years ago

  • 0
  • 1
Photo of Xavier Fan

Xavier Fan, Champion

  • 720 Points 500 badge 2x thumb
From what I understand, you have a Requests table, and a Customers table.

The Requests table has a user field, and is related to the Customers table. Which way is the relationship? One Customer has many Requests?

Assuming that the user field in Requests is for the user who's submitting it - then you can run reports in Requests for all Requests being handled by "User A".

If you want to run reports based on the activities of the users - e.g. all the Requests of Customer B being handled by User A - then the normal way would be to have something like a "Customer Rep" table.

The "Customer rep" table would have:
- a user field - for the QuickBase user it's associated with
- related to Requests - one Customer Rep has many Requests

So - this associates the Customer Rep with the Customer - through the Requests.

If you want to avoid having a Customer Rep table - you could always just have a user field directly in the Customer table ("this Customer is handled by User A"). But I think having something like a "Customer Rep" table would be cleaner in the long run.
Photo of Chris Bonney

Chris Bonney

  • 2 Points
Yes, the customer table is a "one to many" to requests table. So one customer to many requests. That part is fine.

I have a customer contact table, too, with one customer to many contacts. But that table is moot really.

 I'm trying to create a form a customer QuickBase USER fills out that is smart enough to know that the USER is from a particular COMPANY.

I don't want to manually assign a users' request to a customer contact record or have the customer choose their customer record from a drop down in a form, I want the form to know that a QuickBase USER is associated with a company in the company table.

Any further ideas? Thanks so much.
Photo of Xavier Fan

Xavier Fan, Champion

  • 720 Points 500 badge 2x thumb
I don't think there's a native QuickBase way to cleanly do what you want - associate a QuickBase user directly with a Company.

I guess you could have a formula field that stores the company that each QuickBase user is associated with - but this would be a pain to maintain.  

Somewhere - you still need to associate the QuickBase user with the company.

Assuming that the QuickBase user you're talking about is a Customer Contact:
The normal way would be to have a user field in the Customer Contact table, and you're assigning the Customer Contact.

So - wherever you're assigning the user, you can assign the Customer Contact instead.  And the Customer Contact is always associated with a Company (one Company has many Customer Contacts).  And the Customer Contact has the user field that you can use to send emails, look up the user name, etc.
Photo of Chris Bonney

Chris Bonney

  • 2 Points
This is great feedback. I see where you're going with this and I'm working on what I think may be a solution based on your insights. Really appreciate you laying it out for me. Great stuff.